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Children’s Colorado Research Shows More Young Athletes with Concussions on Sidelines


Dr. Mark Riederer shows a chart with research results on youth concussion guidelines.(Photo courtesy of CPR/John Daley)
Dr. Mark Riederer shows a chart with research results on youth concussion guidelines.(Photo courtesy of CPR/John Daley)

New, yet-to-be published research from Children’s Hospital Colorado finds that more high school athletes who get concussions are following return-to-play rules. Researchers tracked injury data from 100 U.S. high schools over the past eight years.

In 2007, half of the athletes with concussions didn’t follow recommended guidelines. By 2013, that figure dropped to one in five athletes, according to researcher Dr. Mark Riederer, Pediatric Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellow at Children’s Colorado.

Learn more about Sports Medicine for Young Athletes at Children's Colorado.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, concussions represent 9% of injuries to high school athletes. For male athletes, the highest concussion rates come from football; for female athletes, soccer and basketball have the highest rates.   

Colorado’s youth sports concussion law (.pdf) is also keeping more athletes on the sidelines. It requires coaches be trained on how to recognize a concussion, which is a brain injury generally caused by a blow to the head. Return-to-play rules require a player be removed from action if a concussion is suspected; he or she cannot return to play until a medical professional gives the OK.   

Read the full article from Colorado Public Radio.