Arm Injury

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FIRST AID Advice for Arm Injury - How to Put on a Sling
FIRST AID Advice for Arm Injury - How to Put on a Sling

To put on a sling you first need to have a triangular bandage. Many first aid kits have a triangular bandage.

  • Find the two ends of the triangle that are farthest apart. These are the ends that you will tie around the neck.
  • Lay the arm down the middle of the triangle.
  • Take the two ends of the triangle that are farthest apart and tie them behind the neck. (a square knot is best, but any knot will do).

 

X-Ray - Clavicle Fracture
X-Ray - Clavicle Fracture

The x-ray shows a collar bone (clavicle) fracture in a 9 year old who fell off his bicycle.

X-Ray - Torus Fracture of Wrist
X-Ray - Torus Fracture of Wrist

This x-ray shows a "buckle" or "Torus" fracture of the radius (forearm).

This fracture is most common in children between the ages of 5 and 11. Typically, the child reports having fallen onto his or her outstretched hand.

The main clue to diagnosis is pain that persists longer than a couple hours, especially if the child does not want to use the arm.

Nursemaid's Elbow
Nursemaid's Elbow

The medical term for nursemaid's elbow is subluxation of the radial head.

  • Usually the child won't use the elbow.
  • The palm of the hand is turned downward.
Bruise on Forearm
Bruise on Forearm

Small minor bruise (contusion) on forearm.

FIRST AID Advice for a Bleeding Wound of the Arm
FIRST AID Advice for a Bleeding Wound of the Arm
  • Apply direct pressure to the entire wound with a sterile gauze dressing or a clean cloth.
FIRST AID Advice - Splint for Wrist Fracture or Dislocation
FIRST AID Advice - Splint for Wrist Fracture or Dislocation
  • Immobilize the hand and wrist by placing them on a rigid splint (see drawing).
  • Tie several cloth strips around hand/wrist to keep the splint in place. You can use a roll of gauze or tape instead of cloth strips.

Notes:

  • You can make a splint from: a wooden board, magazine folded in half, folded-up newspaper, cardboard, or a pillow.
  • If you have no splinting materials, then support the injured arm by resting it on a pillow or folded up blanket.
  • After putting on the splint, apply a cold pack or an ice pack (wrapped in a towel) to the area.

 

FIRST AID Advice - R.I.C.E. for Sprains, Strains, and Bruises
FIRST AID Advice - R.I.C.E. for Sprains, Strains, and Bruises

RICE is an acronym for how to take care of a sprain, strain, or bruise. There are four things you should do:

  • REST the injured part of your body for 24 hours. Can return to normal activity after 24 hours of rest if the activity does not cause severe pain.
  • Continue to apply crushed ICE packs for 10-20 minutes every hour for the first 4 hours. Then apply ice for 10-20 minutes 4 times a day for the first two days.
  • Apply COMPRESSION by wrapping the injured part with a snug, elastic bandage for 48 hours. If numbness, tingling, or increased pain occurs in the injured part, the bandage may be too tight. Loosen the bandage wrap.
  • Keep the injured part of the body ELEVATED and at rest for 24 hours. For example, for an injured ankle, place that leg up on a pillow and stay off the feet as much as possible.

 

X-Ray - Normal Clavicle
X-Ray - Normal Clavicle

Disclaimer

The information contained in these topics is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, it is provided for educational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information.

Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider before starting any new treatment or discontinuing an existing treatment. Talk with your healthcare provider about any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing contained in these topics is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment.

  • Not a Substitute - The information and materials in Pediatric HouseCalls Symptom Checker should not be used as a substitute for the care and knowledge that your physician can provide to you.
  • Supplement - The information and materials presented here in Pediatric HouseCalls Symptom Checker are meant to supplement the information that you obtain from your physician. If there is a disagreement between the information presented herein and what your physician has told you -- it is more likely that your physician is correct. He or she has the benefit of knowing your child's medical problems.
  • Limitations - You should recognize that the information and materials presented here in Pediatric HouseCalls Symptom Checker have the following limitations, in comparison to being examined by your own physician:
    • You can have a conversation with your child's doctor.
    • Your child's doctor can perform a physical examination and any necessary tests.
    • Your child could have an underlying medical problem that requires a physician to detect.
    • If your child is taking medications, they could influence how he experiences various symptoms.

If you think that your child is having a medical emergency, call 911 or the number for the local emergency ambulance service NOW!

And when in doubt, call your child's doctor NOW or go to the closest emergency department.

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