Children's Hospital Colorado

"Smooth Movers:" GI Doctors Scoot Around Campus

Children's Hospital Colorado | October 03, 2014
From left to right: Drs. Edwin de Zoeten, Cara Mack and Glenn T. Furuta
From left to right: Drs. Edwin de Zoeten, Cara Mack and Glenn T. Furuta

The Anschutz Medical Campus — home to Children’s Hospital Colorado — is a big place. It’s one square mile to be exact, and can take up to 20 minutes to walk from one side to the other. So when Dr. Glenn T. Furuta decided he needed a quicker way to get from the hospital to his research lab, he starting riding a Razor scooter across campus.

“I needed a way to get back and forth fast. A bike was too big, a Segway was too expensive, but a scooter was just the ticket – it’s fast, fun and good exercise,” said Dr. Furuta, pediatric gastroenterologist and director of the Gastrointestinal Eosinophilic Diseases Program (GEDP) at Children’s Colorado.

Eight years later, Dr. Furuta is still “scooting” around Anschutz Medical Campus (on his blue customized scooter with Texas longhorn handlebars representing his alma mater), and he’s not alone. Fellow physicians Dr. Cara Mack and Dr. Edwin de Zoeten are the newest members of the digestive health scooter crew, aptly named the “Smooth Movers.” 

Not your traditional welcome gift

When Dr. de Zoeten joined the Digestive Health Institute four years ago, Dr. Furuta and Dr. Mack welcomed him to the team with his own Titan scooter. 

“That’s when I knew I was ‘official,’” joked Dr. de Zoeten. “We can get anywhere on campus in about seven minutes, and we never have to worry about parking.”

Scooting toward advances in research and treatment

In addition to caring for kids at Children’s Colorado, the team of GI doctors is busy working on various types of research for pediatric digestive, liver and pancreas conditions.

Dr. Mack is researching ways to optimize the lives of children with liver diseases like biliary atresia; Dr. de Zoeten works to find new treatments for inflammatory bowel diseases; and Dr. Furuta is investigating eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

Learn more about research happening at Children’s Colorado.


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