Children's Hospital Colorado

Research and Innovation at the Kidney Center

At our Kidney Center, we strive to get our patients back where they belong: home. And while the outcomes for our patients consistently meet or exceed national benchmarks, our work is far from done. Our commitment to continually raising the standard of care makes research and innovation a vital part of what we do.

What our kidney research means for kids

We collaborate with other disciplines and institutions to share data, identify best practices and improve approaches to care. Our work transforms care for children with complex kidney diseases here in Colorado and all over the nation. Read about just a few of our efforts below.

  • Co-led by Children's Hospital Colorado Chief of Pediatric Nephrology Jens Goebel, MD, the Improving Renal Outcomes Collaborative (IROC) invites pediatric hospitals nationwide to share data about patients, learn from each other and implement consistent practices to improve the outlook for children with complex kidney disease. "Our pie-in-the sky goal is that children with a kidney transplant will do just as well as completely healthy children," says Dr. Goebel.
  • About 50% of babies born with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) will develop kidney failure by age 60. Last year, Children's Colorado identified the first drug ever to treat ADPKD's root problem — cyst growth — offering new hope to children born with the disease. Children's Colorado nephrologist Melissa Cadnapaphornchai, MD, lead the research them. "We are the only group doing large-scale drug trials for this disease in children," she says.
  • Children's Colorado's Pediatric Kidney Injury and Disease Stewardship (PKIDS) program is an ambitious, large-scale effort to enhance treatment standards for pediatric kidney injury and disease at every level of care. Through treatment optimization, research development and education, this program targets improvement in every aspect of kidney care for children.
  • Dr. Goebel, in conjunction with multiple institutions nationwide, pioneered research to identify and treat a complication of bone marrow transplantation, called thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). This condition creates rough and irregular linings in the kidney’s blood vessels, causing inflammation.  Once TMA is diagnosed, it responds well to the drug eculizumab, an infusion that helps reduce the inflammation. Dr. Goebel and his team take a multidisciplinary approach to bring more awareness to the risk patients face of developing TMA after a bone marrow transplant.  Read a patient story in which our nephrology and oncology teams worked together to save a child’s life who had cancer.

National leader in pediatric kidney care

Besides advancing treatment, our kidney care team leads the national effort to develop and implement practices that will lead to the best possible outcomes for our patients. And with 100% survival for transplant patients one year out from the operation — and zero transplant failures — our kidney care team posts some of the best outcomes anywhere.

National Kidney Foundation awards grant to Children’s Colorado dietician

Abbey Eldridge, pediatric renal dietitian, received a $70,000 grant to study bone disease in infants with chronic kidney disease. See a media story from Fox 31 Denver about the grant and our researchers’ work to standardized guidelines for treatment.

Learn more about our Kidney Program at Children's Colorado.


PRODWEBSERVER2