Children's Hospital Colorado

Traumatic Injury Research at Children's Hospital Colorado

Our faculty and staff within the Trauma Program of Children's Hospital Colorado are dedicated to improving outcomes for injured patients. Our success is due to the collaboration between all the services that impact injured children.

Dr. Moulton holds a small robot device showing pressure fluctuations of a beating heart.
Research article

Learn how a trauma surgeon's research used big data from electronic medical records to create a brand new vital sign.

Two girls wearing helmets stand on their bikes in a park.
Research summary

Trauma Program advancements

The Trauma Program has a very active group of research staff from all disciplines. They participate in clinical projects, federally funded projects through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Department of Defense (DoD) in the areas of trauma, burn, wound and critical care. The team also uses multiple databases to focus on injury prevention, outcomes and epidemiology.

"Our program encompasses prevention and prehospital care, as well as emergency, diagnostic, acute, surgical and rehabilitation care. We're also engaged in research, education and advocacy that helps injured children get back to being a kid as quickly as possible."

Steven Moulton, MD

Medical Director, Trauma Program

What our traumatic injury research means for kids

Our translational and basic laboratory research includes studies of pediatric traumatic brain and orthopedic injuries, minimizing blood loss and transfusion, and improving surgical infection outcomes.

  • The body's response to blood loss depends on a number of variables — fatigue, hydration and genetics, to name a few — and is notoriously difficult to measure. Children's Colorado trauma surgeon, Steven Moulton, MD, has developed a revolutionary device that makes it look easy. It's the first device in the world capable of reliably measuring blood loss physiology, and it does it in real time in an interface as easy to read as a fuel gauge.
  • A group led by Kathleen Adelgais, MD, created an educational module to improve the ability of clinicians to recognize intentional injuries, as opposed to accidental ones, to improve accuracy in reporting suspicions of child abuse. Learners are exposed to many cases in succession, yielding an experience that would take years for an average medical provider to acquire through clinical practice alone.

Learn more about the Trauma Program.

Contact us

720-777-6282
emergency.outreach@childrenscolorado.org

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