Children's Hospital Colorado

Impact of Sleep Extension on Insulin Sensitivity and Dietary Intake in Adolescents Research Study

Breathing | August 15, 2018
Diagnosis
Teenagers enrolled in high school who get less than 7 hours of sleep on school nights
Age
14-19
COMIRB number
17-2095
Compensation
Yes

Researchers at Children’s Hospital Colorado want to learn more about sleep and insulin resistance in teenagers, and how this may depend on sleep. 

Participating teens receive up to $220 as compensation for their time.

Submit this screening survey to find out if you qualify.

Purpose of the study

This study aims to learn more about sleep and insulin resistance (insulin not working) in teenagers, and how this may depend on sleep. This is important to know so that we understand how sleep may play a role in health conditions like extra weight gain (increased food intake and less physical activity) and diabetes.

Research details

To answer this question, we plan to enroll teenagers who get less than 7 hours of sleep on school nights and measure changes in insulin sensitivity and dietary intake after a week of typical sleep (sleeping on their normal school schedule) and a week of longer sleep (spending 1 or more hours longer in bed each night).

If you qualify you will receive:

  • Health and physical exam
  • Assessment of your sleep patterns
  • Measurement of how well your body uses and produces insulin

This research is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Contact

For questions, please contact Karissa Valente:

Phone: 720-777-8486
Email: Karissa.Valente@childrenscolorado.org

Principal Investigator: Stacey L. Simon, PhD, Children’s Colorado


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